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Hydrobiid Snail (West Gawler)

SPECIES MANAGEMENT PROFILE

Beddomeia averniHydrobiid Snail (West Gawler)

Group:Mollusca (shellfish), Gastropoda, Hypsogastropoda, Hydrobiidae
Status:Threatened Species Protection Act 1995: endangered
Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999: Not listed
Endemic
Status:
Endemic in Tasmania and restricted
Click to enlarge
Beddomeia averni is a tiny (2-4 mm) freshwater snail occurring in small headwater streams near Preston, central north Tasmania. The species has a very narrow range, known only from three small streams with a combined length of 1100 m in which the snails are present. The principal threats to B. averni are agricultural and forestry practices which can result in habitat modification or degradation. The species occupies small streams which are afforded the least protection in areas subject to forest harvesting. Two of these flow through in pine plantations.  B. averni may also be impacted by competition with and displacement by the exotic snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum, introduced from New Zealand. The principal management objectives for B. averni include preventing the loss or degradation of habitat supporting known populations, increasing public awareness of the species, locating new subpopulations, and improving the species' reservation status.

Key Points

  • Important: Is this species in your area? Do you need a permit? Ensure you’ve covered all the issues by checking the Planning Ahead page.
  • Important: Different threatened species may have different requirements. For any activity you are considering, read the Activity Advice pages for background information and important advice about managing around the needs of multiple threatened species.
  

​Habitat

  • 'Habitat’ refers to both known habitat for the species (i.e. in or near habitat where the species has been recorded) and potential habitat (i.e. areas of habitat with appropriate characteristics for the species and within the species' potential range which have not yet been adequately surveyed).
  • If in doubt about whether a site represents potential habitat for this species, contact the Threatened Species Section for further advice.
  • The known range of B. averni includes three small streams near Preston, central north Tasmania, flowing into the West Gawler River (see distribution map, above). The potential range for B. averni is unlikely to extend greatly beyond the current known range.
  • Habitat for B. averni includes the following elements: submerged leaf litter, woody debris and rocks in the stream channels, located on the underside of submerged material.

What to avoid

  • Damage to populations through agricultural and forest practices
  • Damage to downstream habitat through upstream agricultural and forest practices
  • Damage to stream habitat through altered flow regimes (e.g. due to construction of water impoundments upstream of populations).

Surveying

Key Survey reliability more info
M Peak survey period
M Potential survey period
M Non-survey period

To ensure you follow the law - check whether your survey requires a permit. Always report any new records to the Natural Values Atlas, or send the information direct to the Threatened Species Section. Refer to the Activity Advice: Surveying page for background information.

Species Spring Summer Autumn Winter
Beddomeia averni S S O O N N D D J J F F M M A A M M J J J J A A

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  • B. averni is a very small, cryptic species which can be difficult to tell apart from other species of Beddomeia and some other hydrobiid snails. Identification to species normally requires a specialist.
  • For further information on assistance in surveying or identifying this species, contact the Threatened Species Section.

Helping the species

  • ​If you live or work in the area where the species occurs (see distribution map, above), look out for and record any observations of the species. All records of this species can provide important information on distribution and abundance.
  • Important! Always report any observations of the species to the DPIPWE Natural Values Atlas, or else provide the data direct to the Threatened Species Section. Records stored on the NVA are a permanent record and are accessible to other people interested in this species.
  • Consider the needs of the whole habitat. Preserving a threatened species' habitat is the best way to manage both the species and the environment in which it lives.
  • For long-term protection of populations on private land – consider protection of habitat through a vegetation management agreement or conservation covenant.

Cutting or clearing trees or vegetation

  • ​Activities which result in habitat degradation are the principal threats to B. averni, including clearing of streamside vegetation.
  • To avoid damage to stream habitat – do not remove streamside vegetation around populations.
  • To avoid downstream impacts – do not clear streamside vegetation upstream of populations.

Burning

  • ​Activities which result in habitat degradation are a principal threat to B. averni, including burning of streamside vegetation.
  • To avoid damage to stream habitat – do not burn streamside vegetation around populations.
  • To avoid downstream impacts – do not burn streamside vegetation upstream of populations.

Agriculture

  • ​Activities which result in habitat degradation are a principal threat to B. averni, including clearing of streamside vegetation and conversion to pasture.
  • To avoid downstream impacts – do not clear and convert (e.g. to pasture or plantation) streamside vegetation upstream of populations.

Stock grazing

  • To avoid damaging habitat – protect streamside habitat from stock by fencing and provide alternative access to water.

Construction

  • ​Activities which result in habitat degradation are a principal threat to B. averni, including alterations to flow conditions within stream habitat.
  • To avoid damage to stream habitat – avoid alterations to stream flow conditions, for example through construction of water impoundments upstream of populations.
  • To avoid loss of habitat – ensure appropriate surveys are undertaken during the planning stage for dam construction in areas of habitat.

Subdivision

Earthworks

Changing water flow / quality

  • ​Activities which result in habitat degradation are a principal threat to B. averni, including alterations to flow conditions within stream habitat and pollution of the waterway.
  • To avoid damage to stream habitat – avoid alterations to stream flow conditions, for example through construction of water impoundments upstream of populations.
  • To avoid reducing water quality - protect streamside habitat from stock by fencing and provide alternative access to water.

Use of chemicals

  • ​Activities which result in habitat degradation are a principal threat to B. averni, including pollution of the waterway. Sources of chemical pollution include pesticides and herbicides, and fertiliser runoff into waterways.
  • To avoid damage to stream habitat – do not use herbicides and pesticides in the vicinity of populations where this could lead to input of chemicals into the waterway.
  • To avoid damage to stream habitat – avoid application of fertiliser in the vicinity of populations where this could lead to runoff of fertiliser into the waterway.

Recreation

Further information

​Check also for listing statement or notesheet pdf above (below the species image).

Cite as: Threatened Species Section (). (): Species Management Profile for Tasmania's Threatened Species Link. . Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, Tasmania. Accessed on .

Contact details: Threatened Species Section, Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment, GPO Box 44, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, 7001. Phone (1300 368 550).

Permit: A permit is required under the Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 to 'take' (which includes kill, injure, catch, damage, destroy and collect), keep, trade in or process any specimen or products of a listed species. Additional permits may also be required under other Acts or regulations to take, disturb or interfere with any form of wildlife or its products, (e.g. dens, nests, bones). This may also depend on the tenure of the land and other agreements relating to its management. ​​​​​